The Franchise Owner's most trusted news source


Log In / Register | Oct 19, 2017
Historical hotels, people and things in hospitality

The Breakers Hotel, Palm Beach, Florida

Henry Morrison Flagler's first hotel in Palm Beach was the 439-room Royal Poinciana which opened in 1894. It was called the "Queen of Winter Resorts" and was considered the largest resort hotel in the world.

West Baden Springs Hotel, Indiana

In 1855, the town of Mile Lick, a mile north of the giant salt lick and springs in French Lick was renamed West Baden. In 1888, Lee Wiley Sinclair acquired controlling interest in the West Baden Hotel. Sinclair promoted his hotel as a cosmopolitan resort including a casino known as "The Carlsbad of America", an opera house, a two-deck covered oval bicycle and pony track.

French Lick Springs Hotel

The first hotel was built on this site in 1845 by Dr. William Bowles as a health resort to take advantage of the natural sulphur springs and mineral water. The original hotel burned down in 1897 but was rebuilt on a grander scale by Thomas Taggart, the mayor of Indianapolis (and later a U.S. Senator).

Montauk Manor

The history of modern Montauk on eastern Long Island is intimately interwoven with the legendary real-estate developer Carl Graham Fisher. In 1925, Fisher purchased the entire peninsula of Montauk – over 10,000 acres in total for $2.5 million – to develop as a grand resort.

Iowa Franchise Investment Act

As you probably know, there are no federal laws requiring franchisors to abide by the common law duty of good faith in their dealings with franchisees; no fiduciary duty when the franchisor handles its franchisees' money in pooled advertising funds; and no duty of due care that the franchisor must show to its franchisees. It is the absence of national minimum standards of fair dealing that is responsible for most franchise litigation.

Hotel Burnham

Located in the heart of Chicago's loop, the Hotel Burnham is one of the most important early skyscrapers in America. Originally built as the Reliance Building, it was designed by John Root and Charles B. Atwood of the Burnham and Root architectural firm.